Single Throw's Internet Marketing Post

Single Throw is an Internet Marketing firm that helps businesses with sales lead generation by making sure your message is in the right place at the right time - when a customer is searching and has need - when they are most likely to make a buying decision. We call this "From Search to Success." In this blog, Single Throw's experts will share their insights on the state of business and marketing, both online and offline, as well explore new areas of Internet Marketing.

Friday, March 17, 2006

Contact points are key to business

Godin had a good example today of how NOT to do business. Well worth sharing a second post today.

It's a quick read, check it out.

We tell our customers all the time that every contact point is key. While they may have minimum sales on this site, there's better ways of telling a customer. Customers should know that before they shop. At minimum, they certainly should be told nicely at purchase time.

Essentially this company has made a business decision that $12.95 is the minimum worthwhile purchase for them. That's a shame. There's lots of other sites out there willing to sell the same without asking them to fill their basket. eBay has tons of them.

I wonder how many others went and tried this out. They'll likely have more abandoned carts today then they've ever had. Or maybe not.

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3 Comments:

  • At 3:12 PM, Blogger Dan McKay said…

    Sorry, not EVERY customer is a WORTHWHILE customer to have. It's like those businesses that say "we lose money on every sale, but make it up in volume!" HUH? Certainly you shoudl take into consideration the long-term value of a customer, but for the craft business that Seth highlighted, it might be too small an operation and their cost, time and trouble of filling an order too much to ship orders less than $13.

     
  • At 3:12 PM, Blogger Dan McKay said…

    Sorry, not EVERY customer is a WORTHWHILE customer to have. It's like those businesses that say "we lose money on every sale, but make it up in volume!" HUH? Certainly you shoudl take into consideration the long-term value of a customer, but for the craft business that Seth highlighted, it might be too small an operation and their cost, time and trouble of filling an order too much to ship orders less than $13.

     
  • At 3:50 PM, Blogger Single Throw said…

    Excellent point, Dan. And I agree, as a business, a decision has to be made as to what business makes sense to pursue.

    Problem is the message and the perception of the message. Often shopping carts and form processes are put into effect without consideration for those little details, like a message such as the one discussed here. The point on all sides is that there's definitely better ways to interact with a customer.

     

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